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Hearing Howard Chang talk about "homophone creep" (a term that I like very much) made me think of the problem that I encounter every year when reading Hamlet. At one point in the play, either Rosencranz or Guildenstern uses the expression

"niggard of question. . . " Invariably, the student who is reading that part pronounces the word as "ni-GARD, " because s/he is unwilling to say "NIG-gerd. " We do tend to be very sensitive to "the N-word. " Sometimes I think that it is the only taboo word left in the English language. Yet the modern history of terminologies for people of African ancestry is confusing. 50 [50 mg cialis dose] mg cialis dose martin luther king, in the 1950s and 1960s, used to refer to the struggles of "the negro. " (Malcolm X referred to "the so-called Negro. ") When I was in high school in the early 1970s, the term "black" (which is the most commonly accepted neutral term nowadays) was actually the beginning of a phrase which was much more hurtful than "------;" namely, "black son of a bitch. " Only recently has "black" begun to reclaim its place from "African-American" as the most common accepted term for a person of African heritage. It's difficult even to write about this topic, because it's difficult to talk about race in America. We are all self-conscious about it--and that results in some occasionally tortuous attempts at political correctness. I remember once hearing someone (I think it was a liberal politician, but I'm not sure), while trying to distinguish a black African from a white African, refer to the person in question as an "African-American African. " In a recent podcast about puns, I told a joke that may have been perceived by some as mildly racist. The term "squaw" has been misunderstood by some to be etymologically related to a prostitute, or a woman's genitals (the etymology is actually neutral 50 mg cialis dose, from 50 mg cialis dose a Narraganset word meaning simply "woman"). I knew that, but I told the joke because it contained three different puns in the punchline--a pun on the word "square, " one on the word "sides, " and one on the word "hypotenuse. " I realized right after telling it that some listeners might be uncomfortable with the term "squaw, " even though it is not originally an epithet. If I had it to do again, I probably would have chosen a less politically charged joke.


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